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7th Grade Lesson Plans

Monday, October 14th

No School

 

Tuesday, October 15th

1.4 Analyzing Patterns at Plate Boundaries

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

 

ESS2.B: Plate Tectonics and Large-Scale System Interactions:

Maps of ancient land and water patterns, based on investigations of rocks and fossils, make clear how Earth’s plates have moved great distances, collided, and spread apart. (MS-ESS2-3) 

 

Students learn:

 

The plates of Earth’s outer layer move.

Earthquakes provide evidence that the plates of Earth’s outer layer move.

 

Lesson at a Glance

 

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students articulate what they think about the relationship between earthquakes and plate motion.

 

 

2: Simulating Earthquakes (17 min.)

Using the Plate Motion Sim, students gather evidence to support or refute the claim they selected in the Warm-Up.

 

 

3: Modeling a Plate Boundary (15 min.)

Students demonstrate their understanding of how earthquake patterns are related to plate boundaries by creating a model depicting this relationship along the plate boundary between Africa and South America. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of what plates are and that plates can move.

 

 

4: Considering the Mesosaurus Exhibit (8 min.)

Students consider two competing claims about the unit’s central mystery (how did the Mesosaurus fossils get so far apart?).

 

 

5: Homework

Students explain their thinking about the evidence they have gathered so far.

 

 

6: Self-Assessment (Optional)

Students check their understanding of important content in the unit, and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about why the fossils of Mesosaurus that once lived together are found in different locations on Earth now.

Wednesday, October 16th

2.1 Considering what’s Underneath Earth’s Plates

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

 

ESS1.C: The History of Planet Earth:

Tectonic processes continually generate new ocean sea floor at ridges and destroy old sea floor at trenches. (HS.ESS1.C GBE) (secondary to MS-ESS2-3)

Students learn:

  • Rocks can be hard solids or soft solids.

  • Earth’s plates move on top of a soft, solid layer of rock called the mantle.

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students evaluate the Chapter 2 Question: How did the South American Plate and African Plate move?

2: Considering the Mantle (10 min.)

Students use the Sim to gather evidence about the mantle in order to draw conclusions about this soft, solid layer of rock underneath the plates.

3: Exploring Characteristics of the Mantle (10 min.)

Students investigate a soft, solid material (Silly Putty) and a hard, solid material (plastic cube) to learn about the characteristics of Earth’s mantle.

4: Word Relationships (20 min.)

Students engage in a discourse routine that enables them to increase their understanding of unit vocabulary and to practice using it.

5: Homework 

Students consider another rocky planet and apply what they have learned about how the consistency of the mantle affects plate motion.

 

Thursday, October 17th

2.2 “Listening to Earth” 

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

  • ESS1.C: The History of Planet Earth: 

    • Tectonic processes continually generate new ocean sea floor at ridges and destroy old sea floor at trenches. (HS.ESS1.C GBE) (secondary to MS-ESS2-3) 

Students learn:

  • Reading actively means thinking about one’s own understanding as one reads.

  • Identifying unknown words and phrases while reading is an important strategy that can help a reader understand a text more deeply.

  • Scientists use a range of techniques and tools to gather evidence about plate boundaries on the ocean floor.

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

In preparation for reading “Listening to Earth,” students make a prediction about what they could see at a plate boundary under the ocean.

2: Active Reading: “Listening to Earth” (25 min.)

Students practice the Active Reading approach while learning about how plates move toward and away from each other at plate boundaries. This activity provides an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ ability to engage with scientific texts and identify challenging words.

3: Discussing Annotations (15 min.)

Students discuss their thinking about the reading in order to share important insights and surface alternate conceptions. Students then discuss challenging words they identified when they read. Students’ annotations provide an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ annotation skills, reading comprehension, and content understanding.

4: Homework 

Students make connections between what they are learning and what they have learned about other science topics in the past.

 

Friday, October 18th

Substitute:

Students will complete a Newsela article with 3 annotation marks.