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8th Grade Lesson Plans

Monday, January 6th- Friday, January 10th

Monday, January 6th

Students learn:

The energy used to move a magnet against a magnetic force is stored as potential energy in the magnetic field.

Sharing ideas is an important and valuable way to learn from one another and deepen our understanding of science ideas. 

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students use a Modeling Tool to demonstrate their developing understanding of energy in systems of magnets, predicting how potential energy and kinetic energy change when two magnets repel.

2: Simulating Energy Changes (20 min.)

Students use the Magnetic Fields Simulation to explore changes in energy in a system of magnets, building on their ideas about the relationship between energy and force.

3: Write and Share: Force and Energy (20 min.)

Students respond to prompts using key vocabulary terms in order to build on their current understanding of how force can convert energy in a system from one form to another.

Tuesday, January 7th

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive or repulsive, and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS-PS2-3)

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, or a ball, respectively). (MS-PS2-5)

PS3.A: Definitions of Energy:

A system of objects may also contain stored (potential) energy, depending on their relative positions. (MS-PS3-2)

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer:

When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)

PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces:

When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)

Students learn:

Creating a model of a magnetic system and defining its parts helps scientists test and explain the relationship between force and energy.

When a magnet system stores more potential energy, there can be a greater change to a magnet’s kinetic energy.

Lesson at a Glance

 

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students demonstrate their understanding of the relationships between force, potential energy, and kinetic energy in a system of magnets.

2: Reviewing Energy in a System (10 min.)

The teacher reviews important ideas about where kinetic energy comes from and how potential energy is stored in a system, using the Harnessing Human Energy Simulation.

3: Simulating Spacecraft Launch Energy (15 min.)

Students simulate spacecraft launches in the Magnetic Fields Simulation to gather data and evaluate the remaining claims.

4: Modeling Spacecraft Launch Energy (15 min.)

Students synthesize their ideas about energy and magnetic fields by creating visual models of the Tuesday and Wednesday spacecraft launches. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of these ideas, as well as students’ application of the crosscutting concept of Systems and System Models.

5: Self-Assessment (Optional)

Students check their understanding of important content in the unit and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about magnetic fields.

Wednesday, January 8th

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive or repulsive, and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS-PS2-3)

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, or a ball, respectively). (MS-PS2-5)

PS3.A: Definitions of Energy:

A system of objects may also contain stored (potential) energy, depending on their relative positions. (MS-PS3-2)

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer:

When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)

PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces:

When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)

Students learn:

 

Some magnet systems produce a stronger magnetic force than others.

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students activate their thinking about force and energy by considering how the energy of a magnet system will change when a magnet is moved against a stronger force.

2: Exploring Force and Potential Energy (30 min.)

Students test variables that affect the amount of potential energy stored in systems of magnets and determine that a stronger force transfers more energy.

3: Reflecting on Force and Potential Energy (10 min.)

Students discuss their discoveries in the hands-on activity and find out how moving a magnet against a stronger force affects energy in the magnetic field.

4: Homework

Students record their initial ideas or questions about what could have made the magnetic force so much stronger in the Wednesday launch.

Thursday, January 9th

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive or repulsive, and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS-PS2-3)

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Gravitational forces are always attractive. There is a gravitational force between any two masses, but it is very small except when one or both of the objects have large mass—e.g., Earth and the sun. (MS-PS2-4)

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, or a ball, respectively). (MS-PS2-5)

PS3.A: Definitions of Energy:

A system of objects may also contain stored (potential) energy, depending on their relative positions. (MS-PS3-2)

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer:

When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)

PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces:

When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)

Students learn:

 

Moving a magnet against a stronger magnetic force transfers more energy to the magnetic field.

A magnetic force is stronger closer to a magnet.

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

To prepare for the lesson, students consider two claims about how moving against a magnetic force can store different amounts of potential energy in the magnetic field and record their current thoughts.

2: Simulating Magnetic Force (20 min.)

Students measure magnetic force in the Magnetic Fields Simulation to find evidence that supports or refutes the claims.

3: Write and Share: Magnetic Force Strength (20 min.)

Students respond to prompts with vocabulary terms to build on their current understanding of how moving against a magnetic force can store different amounts of potential energy in the magnetic field. The teacher uses this as an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding that moving against a stronger force transfers more potential energy into the magnetic field.

4: Homework

Students use the Modeling Tool to show their understanding of the strength of magnetic force and energy. They also read a short article about black holes to extend their understanding of non-contact forces and expose them to ideas about gravitational fields.

 

Friday, January 10th

NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive or repulsive, and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS-PS2-3)

PS2.B: Types of Interactions:

Forces that act at a distance (electric, magnetic, and gravitational) can be explained by fields that extend through space and can be mapped by their effect on a test object (a charged object, or a ball, respectively). (MS-PS2-5)

PS3.A: Definitions of Energy:

A system of objects may also contain stored (potential) energy, depending on their relative positions. (MS-PS3-2)

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer:

When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)

PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces:

When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)

Students learn:

Using transition words and phrases in a causal explanation can signal that you are talking about a series of events, which can help make the explanation clearer.

Lesson at a Glance

1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

Students consider two subclaims for Claim 3 in order to begin thinking about why the magnetic force may have been stronger in the Wednesday launch.

2: Analyzing the Spacecraft Launches (20 min.)

Students analyze and sort evidence to conclude that moving the spacecraft closer to the launcher in the Wednesday launch required a stronger force and transferred more energy into the system.

3: Modeling the Spacecraft Launches (10 min.)

Students create their final visual models to show why the launch speed of the model spacecraft was so much faster than expected on Wednesday. The teacher uses this as an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of force and energy in a system of magnets.

4: Preparing to Explain the Launches (5 min.)

The teacher reviews evidence about the spacecraft launches and introduces students to transition words and phrases that are useful when writing causal explanations.

5: Homework

Students apply their knowledge of magnetic systems, force, and energy as they write a final explanation to the USA about the spacecraft problem.